First Minnesota & Twentieth Maine

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1ST Minnesota & 20th Maine

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St. Patrick's Day,
March 17, 1863

Company K Roster
1861-1864

User's Guide

 

This page contains the data from William J. Fox's Regimental losses in 
the American Civil War, 1861-1865. A treatise on the extent and nature 
of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records
on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. By William F. Fox ... Publisher: Albany, Albany Pub. Co., 1889. 
Description: vi, 595 p. 30 cm.   This book is a compilation of the actions and losses sustained by the leading regiments in the Union Army during the Civil War.  
The tables offer a means to objectively compare the 1st Minnesota and the 20th Maine.

Both Ken Burn's in the PBS Civil War series and Michael Schaara in Killer Angels
which was the basis for the movie Gettysburg, focused on the exploits of the 20th Maine. Many regiments made significant contributions to the outcome of this great battle but the limitations of print and film media restrict the ability of films and 
novels to tell the complete story of an event.

 

 

 

 

FIRST MINNESOTA INFANTRY

 

HARROW'S BRIGADE - GIBBONS DIVISION - SECOND CORPS

 

Col. Willis A. Gorman - Brig. Gen. (5) Col. William Colville, Jr.; Bvt. Brig. Gen.

Col. Napoleon J. Dana; Marjor-Gen. (6) Col. Charles P. Adams; Bvt. Brig. Gen.

Col. Alfred Sully; Major-Gen. (7) Col. Mark W. Downie

Col. George N. Morgan

Killed and Died of Wounds  Died of Disease, Accidents, In Prison

Companies

Officers

Men

Total

Officers

Men

Total

Total Enrollment

Field & Staff

0

0

0

0

0

0

21

Company A

1

20

21

1

5

6

113

Company B

0

11

11

0

5

5

108

Company C

1

28

29

1

11

12

134

Company D

1

13

14

0

6

6

128

Company E

2

10

12

0

6

6

120

Company F

0

16

16

0

7

7

124

Company G

2

11

13

0

12

12

120

Company H

0

13

13

0

6

6

123

Company I

1

17

18

0

8

8

127

Company K

2

17

19

0

4

4

124

Veteran A

0

11

11

New

27

27

0

Veteran B

0

10

10

Battalion

     
               

Totals

10

177

187

2

97

99

1,242

               

 

187 killed - 15 per cent

Total of killed and wounded, 585: missing and captured, 136; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 13.

 

BATTLES K & M.W. BATTLES K. & M.W.

First Bull Run, Va………………………….. 48 Fredericksburg, Va………………….. 1

Picket, Va., Oct. 22, 1861………………….. 1 Gettysburg, Pa………………………. 75

Goose Creek, Va…………………………… 1 Bristoe Station, Va………………….. 2

Fair Oaks, Va………………………………. 2 Petersburg, Va. (assault, 1864)……… 3

Picket, Va., June 1, 1862…………………… 1 Jerusalem Road, Va…………………. 4

Savage Station, Va…………………………. 10 Siege of Petersburg, Va……………… 5

Glendale, Va……………………………….. 1 Deep Bottom, Va…………………….. 5

Flint Hill, Va., Sept. 1, 1862………………. 1 Ream's Station, Va…………………… 2

Vienna, Va., Sept. 2, 1862………………… 4 Boydton Road, Va……………………. 1

Antietam, Md……………………………… 20

 

Present, also, at Yorktown; West Point; Peach Orchard; Malvern Hill; Second Fredericksburg; Mine Run; Strawberry Plains; Hatcher's Run; Farmville; Appomattox.

Notes. - The greatest regimental loss in any battle, in proportion to the number engaged, occurred in the ranks of the First Minnesota, at Gettysburg. In that battle, on the afternoon of the second day, the Confederates had broken through Sickles's ranks, and were about seizing an important position within the Union lines. They only body of troops at hand was the First Minnesota. Hancock, desiring to impede the enemy's advance until reinforcements could be brought up, ordered Colville to charge the advancing Confederate brigade with his regiment. Alone and unsupported it attacked them, drove them back, and captured their colors. But it was accomplished at a terrible cost; of the eight companies engaged - 262 all told - 215 were killed and wounded. It is the largest percentage of loss recorded in the annals of modern warfare. It as in action again on the following day, its casualties at Gettysburg aggregating 51 killed, and 173 wounded; total, 224. This regiment was organized April 29, 1861, and was the first in the Union Army to be mustered in for three years. It fought at First Bull Run - then in Franklin's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division. Its casualties on that field were 42 killed, 108 wounded, and 30 missing, the largest loss sustained by any regiment there. It was assigned, soon after, to the First Brigade, Second Division, Second Corps, in which it remained during its service.

 

 

 

 

TWENTIETH MAINE INFANTRY

 

VINCENT'S BRIGADE - GRIFFIN'S DIVISION - FIFTH CORPS

 

Col. Adelbert Ames, W.P.E.A.; Bvt. Major-Gen. U.S.A. (3) Col. Charles D. Gilmore

Col. Joshua I. Chamberlain; Bvt. Major-Gen. U.S.V. (4) Col. Ellis Spear; Bvt. Brig. Gen. U.S.V.

Killed and Died of Wounds Died of Disease, Accidents, In Prison

Companies

Officers

Men

Total

Officers

Men

Total

Total Enrollment

Field & Staff

0

0

0

0

0

0

19

Company A

2

11

13

0

19

19

164

Company B

1

15

16

0

11

11

150

Company C

1

17

18

0

10

10

169

Company D

1

16

17

0

15

15

170

Company E

0

13

13

0

18

18

140

Company F

1

19

20

1

15

16

174

Company G

2

14

16

0

8

8

147

Company H

0

12

12

0

20

20

170

Company I

0

9

9

0

15

15

157

Company K

1

12

13

0

14

14

161

Veteran A

     

New

     

Veteran B

     

Battalion

     
               

Totals

9

138

147

1

145

146

1,621

               

 

Total of killed and wounded, 528. Died of disease in Confederate prisons, 15.

 

BATTLES K. & M.W. BATTLES

Fredericksbury Va……………………. 8 Siege of Petersburg, Va…………………… 14

Aldie, Va, June 21, 1863……………... 2 Jerusalem Road, Va……………………….. 4

Gettysburg, Pa………………………… 41 Peebles Farm Va…………………………... 13

Sharpsburg Pike, Md. (1863)…………. 1 Boydton Road, Va………………………… 2

Rappahonnock Station, Va……………. 1 Dabney's Mills, Va………………………… 2

Wilderness, Va………………………... 21 Gravelly Run, Va………………………….. 3

Spotslvania, Va………………………... 12 Five Forks, Va…………………………….. 13

North Anna, Va……………………….. 2 Appomattox, Va…………………………… 1

Bethesda Church, Va………………….. 5 Place Unknown……………………………. 2

 

Present, also, at Antietam; Chancellorsville; Mine Run; Totopotomony; Weldon Railroad; Hatcher's Run.

Notes - The Twentieth Maine could not well be other than a good regiment, under the tuition and lead of such colonels as Ames and Chamberlain. Ames, who was destined to renown as the central figure at Fort Fisher, left the regiment in a few months, but not until he had lead the men in battle, and given them the benefit of his military training and experience. Colonel Chamberlain, a professor at Bowdoin, left his chair in spite of strenuous remonstrance and opposition, and tendered his services to the State. He, also, made a brilliant reputation as a colonel and a general, and is quoted as having said that "he never left one of his wounded in the hands of the enemy, or one of his dead without fitting burial." Chamberlain and his men did much to save the day at Gettysburg, by their prompt and plucky action at Little Round Top. Holding the extreme left on that field, they repulsed a well nigh successful attempt of the enemy to turn that flank, an episode which forms a conspicuous feature in the history of that battle. Their loss at Gettysburg was 29 killed and 96 wounded. General Bartlett commanded the brigade - 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 5th A.C. - at the Wilderness, where the regiment was hotly engaged, May 5th and 6th, with a loss of 13 killed, 82 wounded, and 16 missing. About 200 recruits were received in 1864; in June, 1864, there were only about 275 muskets for duty. It was engaged at Five Forks, with a heavy percentage of loss, and was skirmishing under fire when the surrender took place at Appomattox. After the war closed, the rolls were swelled by accessions from disbanded regiments.

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